Cycle



A woman's diet directly affects her hormones and menstrual cycle. Paying attention to what you eat can produce a more regular, less painful period, and a healthier state of mind.
Many young girls feel underprepared for their first period. Although most will have a general idea of what to expect, fear and embarrassment are all too common.
We’ve all been there—preparing for a long-awaited trip, when we’re hit with the realisation that our period coincides with those meticulously chosen dates.
Menopause is the time in the life of a woman when her periods stop, signalling the end of the reproductive function of her body. Both menopause and perimenopause (the transition to menopause) are associated with a number of symptoms that can significantly affect a woman’s quality of life.
Your nether regions can tell you a lot about your health. Listen while they whisper, so you don’t have to hear them scream.
Headaches. Sore breasts. Mood swings. Irritability. Cramps. Fatigue. Trouble sleeping. Bloating. Food cravings. Acne. PMS is not kind.
Managing your period is time-consuming and expensive, and we’ve all heard stories about wearing white pants on the wrong day. Many women carry the necessities around with them all the time—in case a friend, co-worker, or even a stranger in a public bathroom, might find herself in a messy predicament.
A regular period is a sign of overall good health. If it doesn’t arrive when it should, we worry. Most women experience some variability in their menstrual cycles. How familiar are you with yours?
The average menstrual cycle lasts 28 days. Our lives impact our hormones, and therefore our cycles—for example, stress can delay your period. Some variation is to be expected, but bigger fluctuations are reason to investigate.