Cycle



Life can be extremely unpredictable. Unfortunately, there is no pause button for your period when life gets turned upside down, even in a real disaster. This article will give you some ideas for managing your period, even in an emergency.
A young girl’s first period is an important event that marks the beginning of puberty and entry into womanhood. For some, this is seen as a normal part of growing up, while others must struggle with harmful beliefs embedded in the culture that surrounds them. In this article, you will learn about some of the most common myths and practices related to menstruation and why cultural stigma regarding this natural and unavoidable biological process can be dangerous for young women.
Mobile period trackers have revolutionized access to data-driven knowledge about the female reproductive cycle. Not long ago, all we had was a calendar, a pen, and our own questions. Now, period trackers make it possible to record the daily progress of your menstrual cycle and the symptoms you experience, pinpoint ovulation, predict when your next period will start, help you get pregnant or avoid pregnancy, and much more—all in one simple app on your phone.
As hormone levels begin to drop after ovulation, most women experience some changes in their physical and mental state such as tender breasts, bloating, or moodiness. Such symptoms are often linked with Premenstrual Syndrome, or PMS. For those of us who suffer from Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder, or PDD, the symptoms—especially those having to do with emotions—are noticeably more severe.
Ovulation is, in many ways, the high point of the menstrual cycle. Fertility peaks, as does the body’s ability to withstand pain. You are at your best both mentally and physically. Why, then, is anxiety something many women report experiencing during ovulation?
Menstruation—is it a blessing, a curse, or an inconvenience? Regardless of how we choose to look at it, menstruation is a sign of reproductive health. Some women are now choosing to embrace the natural flow of their period blood.
The menstrual cycle is a major driving force for women’s health and well-being throughout their reproductive years and well beyond. Even so, researchers have only recently started to take periods into account when designing studies; and in every-day life we are only now beginning to distance ourselves from the stigma associated with menstruation. To reclaim periods as a normal and even empowering experience, new approaches to how we view the menstrual cycle are emerging. For example, likening the phases of the menstrual cycle to the seasons of the year.
Cannabis and the various products derived from it are slowly becoming legal for recreational and medicinal uses in many places around the world. The painkilling and relaxing properties of cannabis make it an enticing option for the treatment of menstrual pain and PMS-related symptoms. Interestingly, many women report noticing differences in the effect produced by cannabis products depending on where they are in the menstrual cycle. While research on the effects of cannabinoids—the active substances in the cannabis plant—is still ongoing, it is clear that the menstrual cycle has an effect on how a woman’s body reacts to outside influences, especially in the case of potentially addictive and psychoactive substances.
Vaccines save lives. Thanks to the development of vaccines, we have been able to eradicate or at least control many deadly diseases such as smallpox and polio. Currently, our world is battling the COVID-19 virus, which can also be contained with vaccines. As a valuable defence against life-threatening illnesses, vaccines stimulate the immune system to create the desired antibodies, but the process creates challenges that temporarily affect the body and also the menstrual cycle.
Menstrual and mental health are interconnected and can impact one another. Sometimes the effect is so strong that it disrupts your daily life. Hormonal imbalances, menstrual disorders, and other dysfunctional reproductive processes can make you feel overwhelmed, anxious, and even depressed.
Anxiety is a normal part of our lives. It comes at moments of stress and when we face something new and unfamiliar. Anxiety can present as anything from mild feelings of unease to severe distress—impaired breathing, increased heart rate, an anxiety attack.
The average woman spends roughly six years of her life menstruating. Most of us just accept this as part of life, but it would be really nice not to have to worry about it.
Reproductive-age women experience a menstrual cycle roughly every month. This cyclical process is connected to all the other systems that keep our bodies running and support our capacity for reproduction. The menstrual cycle is sensitive to the other changes that occur in our lives—environmental, emotional, or other.
One of the challenges women face is managing the inconvenience of menstruating while keeping up with all their usual obligations. We’ve compiled some helpful suggestions for keeping things fresh while you’re ‘on the rag’.
Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a group of symptoms, or “syndrome”, that affects the ovaries and ovulation. It is common in women of reproductive age. Women with PCOS produce higher-than-normal levels of androgens (male hormones). This hormone imbalance disturbs the menstrual cycle—infrequent or prolonged periods; and the ovaries may develop numerous follicles (small sacs of fluid that produce hormones and influence fertility) and fail to release eggs regularly, which makes it difficult to get pregnant. An accurate and early diagnosis makes it easier to get the proper treatment to manage symptoms.
Contraceptives, STDs, the onset of menopause—a variety of conditions can cause vaginal blood flow during any time of the menstrual cycle. An accurate diagnosis will point to the most suitable treatment for you.
Far from pleasant—this is how most women would describe their periods—even though menstruation is a completely normal, natural, and more or less regular process. However, menorrhagic menstruation is abnormally heavy bleeding often accompanied by severe cramps.
Pain, fatigue, headaches, stomach upset… Many women find their bodies are more sensitive and prone to fatigue when they are menstruating as blood flow is often accompanied by many unpleasant side effects. So, should we reduce or stop engaging in physical activities during menstruation? The answer is no. Still, there are some nuances worth considering.
There is quite a lot of variability in the menstrual cycle. The average cycle is 28 days long, but anything from 21 to 35 days is considered normal. Tracking your menstrual cycles can help you understand what is normal for you. This will also help you notice irregularities, such as a delayed or missed period, or spotting.
Feeling exhausted when your period starts? You are not alone. Lack of energy just before and during menstruation is very common. Many women feel sleepy and lethargic during that time of month. To live through this phase of the menstrual cycle more serenely it is important to understand what is happening in your body and to take good care of yourself. Finding the right solution for menstrual insomnia means solving a great contradiction: what exhausts you during the day, prevents you from sleeping at night.
A woman's diet directly affects her hormones and menstrual cycle. Paying attention to what you eat can produce a more regular, less painful period, and a healthier state of mind.
Many young girls feel underprepared for their first period. Although most will have a general idea of what to expect, fear and embarrassment are all too common.
Menopause is the time in the life of a woman when her periods stop, signalling the end of the reproductive function of her body. Both menopause and perimenopause (the transition to menopause) are associated with a number of symptoms that can significantly affect a woman’s quality of life.
We’ve all been there—preparing for a long-awaited trip, when we’re hit with the realisation that our period coincides with those meticulously chosen dates.
Your nether regions can tell you a lot about your health. Listen while they whisper, so you don’t have to hear them scream.
Headaches. Sore breasts. Mood swings. Irritability. Cramps. Fatigue. Trouble sleeping. Bloating. Food cravings. Acne. PMS is not kind.
Managing your period is time-consuming and expensive, and we’ve all heard stories about wearing white pants on the wrong day. Many women carry the necessities around with them all the time—in case a friend, co-worker, or even a stranger in a public bathroom, might find herself in a messy predicament.
A regular period is a sign of overall good health. If it doesn’t arrive when it should, we worry. Most women experience some variability in their menstrual cycles. How familiar are you with yours?
The average menstrual cycle lasts 28 days. Our lives impact our hormones, and therefore our cycles—for example, stress can delay your period. Some variation is to be expected, but bigger fluctuations are reason to investigate.
Your monthly cycle is more than having your period every month. There are changes in your body that manifest both visibly and invisibly, affecting you more than you may realise.
Shark week. The crimson tide. Riding the cotton pony. The many, creative terms we have for periods offer little comfort when it’s time for dealing with the unpleasantries that accompany it.